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WHERE'S THE DRAMA?

The stuff that dreams are made of

  FAN-DEPENDENT INITIATIVES & NEWS

Bulletin Board

 

From Roberto Chuter 23 May 2016

 

T H E   H I D D E N   W E L L

THE HIDDEN WELL is a portmanteau feature film, composed of five standalone chapters united by a stylistic framework: five different writers with one director. Each chapter is a simple human story devoid of effects and set pieces, but engineered by emotion and intimacy. Each new character, each new story reflect some kind of surprising crisis: a couple looking for connection, a young man faces a beautiful proposition, a woman finding her estranged father, a devoted husband harbours a burning desire - all of them hiding secrets behind the veil of happiness.

 

Some of these stories in THE HIDDEN WELL are strange, sexy, some are funny, some are tragic and others are bittersweet. The situations presented within the film are to incite discussion and have real, genuine reaction. We hope to give an audience the experience that doesn't disperse immediately but rather lingers in the audience's minds long afterwards.

     

MORE DETAILS

 

________________________________________________ 

 

This from Bill Leimbach (18th June 2016)

 

BILL GOOLD : LIFE & TIMES & ART 

 

I hope you are well.  
Can you please help us in these last 14 days of crowd funding the post production of the Bruce Goold movie? We're almost there. He's a great Australian Artist.  A film needs to be made of his life. We have shot it all. It only needs Post Production. All contributions are also tax deductble.  Its all explained on the Australian Cultural Fund link:

Can you please help us in these last 14 days of crowd funding the post production of the Bruce Goold movie? We're almost there. He's a great Australian Artist. A film needs to be made of his life. We have shot it all. It only needs Post Production. All contributions are also tax deductble. Its all explained on the Australian Cultural Fund link:

 

SUSUPPORT THE ANTAGONIST MOVEMENT !

SUPPORT THE ANTAGONIST MOVEMENT 

Trailer: Self Medicated: a film about art from Ethan H. Minsker on Vimeo.

 Ethan Minsker heads up - or at least is a part of - a revolutionary artists' social network that calls itself THE ANTAGONIST MOVEMENT. He is currently touring and screening his latest documentary, Self-Medicated,  round the world. I had the good fortune of meeting him in Sydney on his recent visit to Australia, and was impressed with the both Ethan and the work. He is currently collecting footage for his next full-length film.  Explore Ethan's world & the world of the Antagonists HERE

 

 

  

                                          DRUM ROLL!!

 

HEY GAYBY FAMILY - We are proud to announce that your film, GAYBY BABY, the shorter television version, has had successful screenings on SBS2. Hope you caught it. 

  

 

 

  

HAVE YOU SEEN THE ELEPHANT?

  

SEEING THE ELEPHANT  

SEEING THE ELEPHANT is a multi-plot tale made up of many tales - a collective initiation story of tribe that is the “hidden” family - that elephant in the room, the workplace, in the streets & on the buses - that few acknowledge or even talk about. Here, the search for “the good life” is conducted at the boundaries, across borders, in forays into the unknown: a Filipino father whose fear that his con might be gay drives him to violence; a Vietnamese mother that refuses to accept her daughter’s Middle-eastern boyfriend, an Afghani uni student whose possessive, widowed mother frustrates his every effort to assert his Independence, a Pakistani daughter, grieving for a dying father that was never able to return her love. Here is a nation composed of many nations. The eternal Elephant in the room of human history, which cannot be seen, which cannot be heard or understood, until every part of it is seen and heard, a fable for this time - for all times - for a world made small by the Internet and mass communication. In such a place, it is only the complete story that encourages the vitality and courage that makes “the good life” possible.

 

 CHECK OUT THE TRAILER!

   

NOW WATCH THE FEATURE - IN 4 PARTS

PART ONE 

PART TWO 

PART THREE 

PART FOUR 

 

 

ABOVE: Writer/producer, Billy Marshall Stoneking (left), w/ Director/producer Amin Palangi (right) & actor, Filino Dolloso (cener) at cast & crew screening of feature film, SEEING THE ELEPHANT.  Watch the TRAILER  
 
 
THE LAUNCH
 
 
 

ABOVE: Actors Filino Dolloso and Jemwel Danao with Stoneking at cast &crew screening

 

(ABOVE)  ON LOCATION with SEEING THE ELEPHANT

   
Producers, Billy Marshall Stoneking & Amin Palangi with SEEING THE ELEPHANT'S trailer editor, Bill Russo
 
                                                                             

  meanwhile...

A BENCHMARK VIDEO

 

Tom Waits' press conference video offers a particularly entertaining  and useful benchmark for film and project makers keen to generate bucks & enthusiasm for their current projects. What makes the clip successful is CHARACTER, along with its originality and very surprising ending

_______________________________________  

 

C h r i s t i n a   C o n r a d   :   HERETIC

                 

               "... an engrossing and unusual documentary"

Anyone that has ever struggled with the competing demands of the day-to-day domesticity and practicalities of the world and the tearing ruthlessness that is the life of an obsessed artist will recognise in this extraordinary confessional documentary a saga to inspire courage and confirm the insight that the creative life is always within reach so long as one is prepared to hoe the wilderness of one's own heart and mind.

For outsider artist, poet and filmmaker, Christina Conrad, it has never been a matter of choice.  Indeed, at times, her life has been something of a sentence, she muses; made more difficult by the plight of being a woman.

Midst a seemingly endless juxtaposition of words, images and music, carried along by the on-going avalanche that is her life, Conrad strives to find the means to express and conduct the tumultuous energy that has torn through her since birth. In the process, she conjures a startling and  unforgettable documentary that proves once again that the best nonfiction films are "best" not because they are the most informative, or most persuasive, or the most useful, but because they are the most creative, effective, and valuable human documents that can be made from the circumstances represented in them. 
 
Accompany Conrad on an unforgettable odyssey of discovery as she exposes the characters behind the legend of her multifarious personality – the child, the barbarian, the earth mother, the misogynist and visionary. Conrad's life-long rebellion against "the art world",  conventional wisdom and phoney respectability, is waged with a freshness and humour that makes talent - though rare - seem so usual a thing.
 
Journey through the eccentric and dramatic life of the mysterious and reclusive outsider artist, Christina Conrad. The film, in keeping with the artist herself, is an exception to most of the rules -  a surprising and confronting mix of odd and original characters, tragic/comic monologues and bizarre improvisations counterpointed by fetishes, masks, icons, paintings, sculptures and photographs, punctuated by an original soundtrack by C.W. Stoneking and Steve Grant.  
 
 80 minutes. Colour/B/W
 
  CURRENTLY IN FILM-FESTIVAL RELEASE WORLD-WIDE

 

Directed, written, designed and performed by

Christina Conrad

Co-directed by Agnieszka Baginska

Cinematography by Zachary Peel-macgregor

Edited by M.C.S. Park, Agnieszka Baginska & Jonathan Wald

Original Music by C.W. Stoneking

Executive producer : Billy Marshall Stoneking

 

THE FACEBOOK GROUP of HERETIC

 

SEE CONRAD'S WEBSITE 

 ______________________________________________________________________________

 

NETWORK THE REVOLUTION !

A shared vision is not the same as a vision shared; and the most effective way of uniting individuals into creative and innovative teams, galvanized by a common purpose is by means of STORY.

A film - or for that matter, any group of creative collaborators - embodies a "culture" to the extent that it presents a collection of common understandings, attitudes and values to which ALL members subscribe and contribute. If it is to grow and flourish, that vision will produce results, and - in the case of a film project - will manifest in a dynamic and living story through which its life and the objectives of the community that made it are expressed.

 

 

By means of story, the meaning, vitality and identity of "the tribe" (or tribes) is continually refreshed and renewed. The essence of this dynamic is what we commonly understand by the word, "Drama". Indeed, filmmakers - like stories - are elevated from the mediocre and mundane by how well they manage and direct the dynamic and dramatic energies alive within the group, and the interactions transpiring between and among all its members (or characters), including its audience. The same can be said of sports teams, schools, government agencies, social groups, and countries.

So welcome to the Revolution - Change is HERE, and its implications for storytelling - especially screen storytelling - are immense. The old questions come back to us; the creative reconstruction of what is possible and HOW it is already happening, along with a complete re-examination and - ultimately - a reconstruction of every aspect of the STORY / CHARACTER relationship, particularly the relationship of Audience to Filmmaker, Filmmaker to Tribe, and Story to Tribe, Audience and Storyteller.

The new technology provides brand new opportunities to re-discover and re-cover the energy inherent in compelling, character-driven DRAMATIC SCREEN STORYTELLING, and with its recovery the experience of novel and revolutionary insights, ideas and practical strategies that one may use in the making, marketing and distribution of dramatic screen stories.

Share the Vision - Build the Courage - Enter the Drama -

Be the Industry - Live the Story . . .

Join FANDEPENDENT FILMMAKING now.   Network the Revolution!

     FAN-DEPENDENT INITIATIVES & NEWS 

 
 
 
 
ONCE MY MOTHER - a Documentary
 
 
 

A DRAMATIC DOCUMENTARY WINS THROUGH

Director Sophia Turkiewicz first pitched a version of Once My Mother around 1975. As she said, "If there was a prize for the Australian film with the longest gestation, I would get it."

While it begins with a far-off atrocity story, it charts the difficult relationship between an abandoned daughter and her traumatized mother which plays out over two lifetimes. The first footage between them goes back to 1976. In the end it is a film about forgiveness - surely a profound current in all our lives.

Sophia brought Rod Freedman on board in late 2009, when they began to record scenes at the old age home in Adelaide with her mother. with her mother.

At that stage they had no money. They were knocked back for development by Screen NSW because they didn`t have a broadcaster. Neither the ABC or SBS were interested.

They partnered with the Kresy Siberia Foundation, which exists to remember the Poles taken to the Gulags by the USSR, to channel private donations of around $15000. With that money, as Rod Freedman explained, they hired a variety of editors do create a first assembly, from which a script was written.

They were knocked back by the Signature Fund at Screen Australia, the only government source of funds which did not require broadcaster interest. Private money paid for part of a trip to the Ukraine, where they shot establishing footage and recreations.

They went back to the Signature Fund with a new trailer and were finally supported. With a new commissioner in place at the ABC, they were given what Rod calls, "less than what we asked for but just enough money to finish a fifty minute version."
"Sophia and I didn't get any money until after post-production was completed. We went through the whole process completely unpaid. We paid for our travel and all the shooting [which Rod did]. We only paid the editors and some worked at reduced rates. In the end I raised the budget which paid me what I would have been paid if we had started with a pre-sale.

The proposal was taken to MeetMarket at the Australian International Documentary Conference twice with different trailers. Said Rod, "The international people we talked to asked if we had a domestic broadcaster. It didn't look good that both broadcasters passed on it - it doesn't help to get overseas interest."

Rod has worked on a series of personal films as camera-director, in a modest, naturalistic mode, so he is used to low budgets and the art of scrimping. By my reckoning, Sophia, Rod and his partner Lesley Seebold made the film for around half the budget that a mainstream factual supplier would have required. We are left to speculate how the film might have changed.

Bob Connolly, associate producer on Once My Mother, and the most lucidly provocative filmmaker on the Australian documentary stage, has thrown a white-hot rock into the tepid pool of factual funding. Connolly who made such landmark films as the Joe Leahy series, Rats in the Ranks, Facing the Music and Mrs Carey`s Concert, was invited to speak at a private screening for investors and donors of Once My Mother.

READ BOB'S SPEECH HERE

  MAKING A FAN-DEPENDENT FEATURE

 

SOME THINGS TO CONSIDER

The Fan-dependent film can be either a fictional or factional story, and is usually a low-budget film. For our purposes, we imagine a low-budget film to be one in which all principal cast and crew are paid for their work, or their work is exchanged for comparable services. A typical low-budget film might be made for as little as twenty-thousand dollars or as much as one or two million. 

Creatives working on low-budget features have to appreciate and empower the restrictions under which they are working. Among other things, this means that it s extremely helpful to remember the wisdom and the value of finding the drama in the one guy playing a triangle instead of the nine characters playing trombones.  And to develop an enthusiasm for scenes whose headings read: "INT. FUNERAL HOME / BACKROOM   NIGHT", rather than "EXT. GRAVEYARD  NIGHT".

Producing any feature film is a challenge, but producing a low-budget feature can be downright hellish. If you can find or provide a relatively easy - albeit thoroughly dramatic - script to produce you make everyone's job not only easier but allow them both to spend that much more time improving on it during production by doing their jobs properly.

The first step in making your movie is putting everything in place before you ever have a camera: polish the script, find the actors, share the vision with prospective collaborators, discuss, prepare, and discuss some more. The luck and good fortune that filmmakers have is proportional to how well prepared they are.

 

Use "points" and screen credit if possible

Trust us; you aren't the only one who wants to see his or her name in lights. Your responsibility is to make sure that you are offering something of real value upon which your collaborators can work and excel. Don't make your first question: "Who can I get to do this for free?" Make it: what do I still have to do to make people want to work on this?  The best way of getting the best possible people is to give them something worthwhile sith which to interact, something they would be proud to have their names on.

In lieu of payment, oe can offer "points" in the project, which also serve as an incentive when it comes to marketing and distributing the film. Points are frequently the lifeblood of low-budget movie making. When you have a great story but very little cash, the extra incentive might just be to invite your collaborators to join your project on the basis of a promise of a percentage of the film's profits. These are the points. Oh, and in case you never got to algebra, you've only got 100 of them. So be stingy with those suckers, they're finite.

 

Get a Director of Photography

When you start the process of converting your screenplay into a film, the most important asset you can acquire is a knowledgeable Director of Photography. Almost every movie has both a Director (probably you) and a Director of Photography (probably not you). A Director of Photography, or DOP, is someone that has a technical understanding of how the camera works, what film to use, and how the lighting will affect the feel of a scene. On a big movie, the DOP makes the action present, and oversees a crew of camera operators, techies and other assistants. On yours, the DOP will be behind the camera him/herself. The Director is usually more concerned with the overall story and the acting, and confers with the DOP about the look and feel of the shots.

One of the best ways to get a DOP is to scour local film schools. While there are a few specialized film schools around the country, most colleges and universities (TAFE for instance) also have film departments, so you are bound to live nearby some source of technical talent. 

Once you get some leads, call prospective DOPs and ask them to send you a "show reel" of their work. You should be able to tell from watching their previous projects whether they can handle your needs. A good one will usually have his/her own camera and will be able to advise on all of the requirements for capturing the images.

 

Find actors, props, and costumes

When looking for actors, try to use your friends or people with a natural ability for acting. Some of the best films currently being made anywhere in the world are coming from Iran, where the filmmakers create under extreme censorship restrictions and abysmally low budgets. They also use - almost exclusively - non-professional actors, which have given these films some of the most outstanding and memorable performances in recent film history.

Likewise, with props and costumes, borrow from friends and family. Or head over to the local thrift shop or Salvation Army to pick up a few items.

 

Scout for locations and hold rehearsals

Don't fool yourself into thinking you can make the next Bond movie for twenty grand. We hope you've written or found a screenplay that involves strong, centred drama, that makes use of realistic settings like local bookstores and coffee shops, or your own living room. Cassavtes used his own house in the making of A Woman Under The Influence. Downstairs was the "set", upstairs was the production office.

If you have any place near you that you think would be cool, just go talk to the owner or manager, let them know you're doing a small project, and ask them for their permission to stop by some time.

If you're worried about getting into legal trouble, you can check to make sure they have public liability, or you can purchase a limited time policy yourself for less money than you might imagine.

Ideally, you'll want to rehearse particular scenes in the same location where you plan to shoot them, but this is always necessary. Keep flexible and confront each potential problem or obstacle as an opportunity for making a new and better discovery concerning how the film might be realised. Make surprise your friend, not your enemy. Remember, if you're using a location that you don't own or control, you may not have the luxury of using the space beforehand. In that case, obviously, you'll need to use your apartment, your parents' basement, the local school gym--wherever. Just be sure you make arrangements to have space somewhere. You can't show up on the day you expect to film without having gone over the scenes. The readiness is all! 

Plan the shoot rigorously with your DP, minimizing as much as possible the number of days you will need to rent equipment and to take people's time. This may involve shooting some sequences out of order if they happen to be set in the same location. It's harder to do, but it saves time and money. 

 

 

Script Guidelines for low-budget features 

Screenplays that fall within the category low-budget can be anything between $20,000 to $1 or $2 million.  The essential ingredients for making a successful low-budget film, over and above the money that is spent, are talent, talent and talent.

Obviously there are no hard and fast rules, but the following considerations should be central to your way of thinking about the writing of a low-budget feature:

 

1. Find an excellent title that has not already been exploited.

Sometimes it is better to keep the title secret until you are dealing with people you can trust. Titles cannot be copyrighted but they can be registered with the MPAA Title Registration Bureau for protection and market coordination -however, if you are signatory to the agreement and another signatory protests your registration, you may have to arbitrate to win access to your own title!

2.  A "high concept" that has not been exploited, sells the show more often than not. The Blair Witch Project, for example.

If it cannot be summarized as to "what it's about" in one or two lines - it MAY NOT be high enough concept to consider. Word-of-mouth takes people to the movies. Word-of-mouth is usually a line or two that generates interest. Try surveying the public for high concepts. This is a good way to find out where your script or movie concept stands. You have to weigh the risk of leaking the concept against the probability that most films never get produced - especially by producers who steal titles.

3. Dramatic characters appeal to audiences.

To say that a character is DRAMATIC means that they are actively pursuing something that matters (to us, the audience) and their best efforts are being undermined or threatened by forces that seek to overtake or even destroy them. YOU MUST HAVE WELL-DEVELOPED CHARACTERS, OR DON'T GO ON.

4.  A mildly didactic story is acceptable

Your film can even have touches of philosophic reverie, as long as it is couched in a strong, CHARACTER-DRIVEN narrative in which the theme is rigorusly challenegd while remaining relevant and universal, and avoiding the three, bastard muses, namely propaganda, sentimentality and pornography. 

5.  The film should be acceptable to a G, PG, PG-13 or R audience.

Usually low budget pictures are R or PG rated, but they don't have to be.

 

6.  The script should be no longer than 95 pages, and preferably 90 pages, typed in standard screenplay format. Courier type preferred (10 characters per inch).

 

7.  The story should not involve more than three main characters.

Yet it should not depend too heavily on ONE character to the extent that it might be dismissed as a "star vehicle" without the star. Fees charged by "Name Talent" rocket the project out of the low budget orbit. Because lazy, scared distributors or financiers use this as an "excuse" to NOT finance or distribute a project, even if the story can be told quite nicely,  without Name Talent, Fan-dependent cinema will have a greater loyalty and allegiance to fans than to convetional distributors.

 

8.  The story should involve, up to 5 minor characters that can be quickly developed.

One of the minor character parts could be a cameo vehicle if it were a particularly challenging or interesting part. It can't hurt to keep this in mind.

 

9.  Include up to 5 bit characters that can be shot on not more than 2 successive days each, AND up to 10 bit characters that can be shot on not more than 1 day each.

 

10.  Have no more than 80 extras throughout the whole film and not more than 40 appearing in any separate scene at a time.

 

11. Use no complicated futuristic or period sets, props or wardrobe. Have no extensive vehicle requirements (such as 30 cop cars or a fleet of boats). 

 

12.  The story should take us through at least 20 different locations but no more than 40. 

Although many locations can double, there should be no more than 10 to 20 physically different locations.  The cheapest way to make a movie is to shoot it all in one house or location, but you get exactly what this says - a cheap movie. With a little more effort and pre-planning, there is no reason why the cast and crew cannot show up at different local places each morning to shoot.

 

13. Have no special effects scenes, or limit them to one or two. If two,  one moderately inexpensive, but not cheap looking, the other about five times as elaborate and as effective as the first.

 

14.  Have 2 or less exterior night scenes, or no night scenes at all.

Although we broke this rule in the shooting of the feature, SEEING THE ELEPHANT, as a general guide night shoots are best to avoid owing to their expense and the fact that they are persnally  draining. If you can’t do it in two days of night scenes, then you may as well have seven days of night scenes as it is difficult and costly to turn your crews' hours around.

 

15.  In general the screenplay should have about 16 to 21 interior scenes and 14 to 18 exterior scenes with about 80% synchronous sound. No more than 10% of the picture should be exterior night, but any amount can be interior night.

 

16.  It is okay to include all or some of the following:

a. Two interior action sequences that break a lot of inexpensive middle class luxuries. The foreign market likes to see the way we live in Australia. Anything up to $9,000 worth can be smashed.  e.g., TVs, video players, musical instruments, microwave ovens, coffee makers, lamps, radios, kitchen appliances, lawn mowers, bikes, motorcycles, etc.

b. Interior action scenes can include such low budget effects as breaking fake glass, punching holes through balsa wood doors, walls, floors, ceilings . . . stuff that can be done in a controlled non-studio environment without fire or explosives. Breaking glass sounds are used in El Mariachi to suggest automobile glass is being smashed even when it isn’t. 

c. Backstage scenes where we only hear the audience or see stock shots of the audience (as long as they do not have to include a character in the shot).

d. One exterior tracking shot with sync dialogue.

e. One interior or exterior action sequence with fast tracking which lends itself to fast cutting.

f. One interior sync dialogue scene in a car during day or night.

g. One or two non-contrived passionate scenes.

h. At least three scenes in some location that has never been filmed in before.

i. A nightclub scene.

j. An easy-to-film scene in some public spot (where stock footage could possibly be integrated).

k. A sequence out in the COUNTRY, MOUNTAINS, FOREST or by a STREAM (that works well with the established settings in the story).

l. Possible locations: ANY AUSTRALIAN HOME/KITCHEN/LOUNGE ROOM, ETC. A  VACANT APARTMENT, HOTEL LOBBY, GYM,  BEAUTY SALONS, HOUSE UNDER CONSTRUCTION, LUMBER YARD, ANIMAL HOSPITAL, MUSIC STORE, COMPUTER DATA PROCESSING CENTER, SOFTWARE STORE, CHURCH, MOTOR HOME OR CUSTOM VAN, AD AGENCY, ARTISTS STUDIO, A LIFT,  ANY OFFICE, COVERED BRIDGE.

Look through the phone book yellow pages to stimulate other ideas.

 

17.  The ending is very important.

It should wrap up all the lose ends and provide an up-beat catharsis. The ending should not have to rely on a lot of explosions and things blowing up. How many movies have you already seen where everything gets blown up in the end?

 

18.  Kenneth Gullekson, a well known writer/director, wraps it up this way: "The most important things are a gripping story and engaging characters. Any subplots focusing on individual characters must be inextricably interwoven with the main plot".

 

 

LINK : LEARNING THROUGH EXPERIMENTATION

 

 

LOOKING AT A FEW ELEPHANTS IN THE AUSTRALIAN "FILM INDUSTRY" ROOM

There are undoubtedly plenty of exceptions, but since I first became entangled in the rather curious bizzness of film-making - going all the way back to my days as a screenwriting student at the Australian Film, Television and Radio School in Sydney (1981), I have constantly seen evidence and been reminded  of how the industry appears to be dominated by three "tribes", which can be loosely characterised as follows:

Tribe 1: People that are hostile towards, ignorant of, and understand nothing or next to nothing about DRAMATIC ACTION.

Tribe 2: People that can tell you what’s wrong with your screenplay/story, but have little if any ability to illuminate its problems in ways that help you gain a fresh and clear perspective so that you might be better able to work through its problems and weaknesses.

Tribe 3: People that not only can determine what’s wrong, but are able and willing to illuminate character and action in ways that constructively aid you in overcoming the screenplay's problems.

If you are a writer that has had any experience with the screen storytelling industry in this country, you have probably met people from all three tribes, and I know which ones you probably prefer to deal with. 

If you've kept you eyes and ears open you've probably also noted the following:

* Virtually no one in the acquisition, development, production or marketing side of the Australian screen storytelling industry would ever admit to being a member of Tribe 1.  But they’re there. A tip to figure their identity: If you ask someone, “What’s the story about,” and they respond by actually telling you the story beat for beat, there’s an awfully good chance they don’t have a very good grasp of the concept of story.

* Most people in this country fall into Tribe 2. They know enough about story to be dangerous. That is they can tell you at least some of the things that are wrong with a script, but often their solutions are uncomfortably wide of the mark, or worse - they want to take over the writing by making suggestions that would force you to radically reinvent the story. They also seem incapable of anticipating how and why this merely creates new problems. They say things like “I know it’s called 'Gayby Babies', but why does it have to be gaybys?”

* If you’re a writer, you hope to find someone from Tribe 3. Stop looking. If you're really a DRAMATIC storyteller, your job is to see and solve problems (with the assistance of the other characters) It's YOUR ability to identify a story’s underlying issues and your insights that allow you to suggest solid, tangible ways to resolve those concerns that will serve you better than anything you'll find in the first two tribes.

However if you are a member of Group 3, and you have a great script, or at least the makings of something that is good, you cannot speak to people that are in Tribe 2 and certainly not Tribe 1 as if they understand story the way you do.

You have to be able to break down your analysis and ideas into a series of graspable talking points.

If you try to impress them with your "deep" understanding of the nuances of story theory and rely too much on jargon, you probably aren't a fully initiated member of Tribe 3 anyway. You will most likely not only lose them, they will probably feel a great deal of discomfort sitting in a room with you.

Instead you must meet them on their level and shape your suggestions into digestible, bite-sized talking points.

This is not to demean them. You may know story, but you probably don’t know squat about business or the subtleties of networking. You have your talent. They have theirs.

And by the way, this is not only about Tribe 3s trying to communicate with Tribe 2s or Tribe 1 people, it’s also about appreciating the fact that people lead extremely busy lives, so being concise and on point is always the strongest and most dramatically effective way of communicating with them.

Bottom line: No one really gives a fuck and you or your story. They don’t really NEED to give a fuck, or know the ins-and-outs of story theory. All they want is for you to fix the damn script! In others, it's entirely up to you to make them give a fuck.

[Note: Are there producers that are members of Tribe 3? Absolutely. And that can be both a blessing and a curse, the former because you benefit from their great ideas, the latter because they will want to explore every conceivable plot possibility, hopefully a beneficial process, but an exhausting one].

 

Some of you might be asking: How do I go about becoming a member of Tribe 3? Apart from those of you that are precociously wise about character, action and dramatic screen storytelling, there is really only one answer. Immerse yourself in cinema. Not just screenwriting, but the entirety of movies.

See every film.
Read every book.
Analyze every script.
Study the business.
Think like a writer.
Think like a director
Think like a producer.

You should envelope yourself in everything related to film-making and the movie business. In other words, you have to love cinema and follow that passion. Passion is the key, because to write a good dramatic story and to make a good dramatic film are among the hardest things in the world to do, and if you don't have a passion for you simply won't have the energy or the will to overcome all the obstacles and complications that will arise in the process of finding the story.

 

FOR MORE ABOUT CROWD-FUNDING YOUR FAN-DEPENDENT FILM CLICK HERE

 

 

GREATEST TED talk ever sold

 

 

Much of the TV, video, film and sport we watch is sponsored by a brand, a product, a corporation. But … why? With humor and persistence, filmmaker Morgan Spurlock dives into the hidden but influential world of brand marketing, on his quest to make a completely sponsored film about sponsorship. And yes, the onstage naming rights for talk were sponsored too. By whom and for how much? He’ll tell you. (Recorded at TED2011, March 2011, in Long Beach, CA. Duration: 19:28)

                   WE DESERVE BETTER

"The problem with distribution and exhibition in this country". More ink has been spilled over this topic in the last 20 years than any other in the industry.

In 2013, are we any closer to finding a route through the bottlenecks that block filmmakers' access to audiences?

Peter Castaldi reignited the debate in his article Australian Cinema is Dead Long Live Australian Cinema. Over the past week, I've talked to Peter about a follow-up which proposes some radical solutions. This week ScreenPro is publishing his article in full.

- See more at: http://www.screenpro.tv/site/item.cfm?item=42C4DA55C290F6C97F46E0DE31270DED#sthash.jkfTGsqX.dpuf

"The problem with distribution and exhibition in this country". More ink has been spilled over this topic in the last 20 years than any other in the industry.

In 2013, are we any closer to finding a route through the bottlenecks that block filmmakers' access to audiences?

Peter Castaldi reignited the debate in his article Australian Cinema is Dead Long Live Australian Cinema. Over the past week, I've talked to Peter about a follow-up which proposes some radical solutions. This week ScreenPro is publishing his article in full.

- See more at: http://www.screenpro.tv/site/item.cfm?item=42C4DA55C290F6C97F46E0DE31270DED#sthash.jkfTGsqX.dpuf

"The problem with distribution and exhibition in this country". More ink has been spilled over this topic in the last 20 years than any other in the industry.

In 2013, are we any closer to finding a route through the bottlenecks that block filmmakers' access to audiences?

Peter Castaldi reignited the debate in his article Australian Cinema is Dead Long Live Australian Cinema. Over the past week, I've talked to Peter about a follow-up which proposes some radical solutions. This week ScreenPro is publishing his article in full.

- See more at: http://www.screenpro.tv/site/item.cfm?item=42C4DA55C290F6C97F46E0DE31270DED#sthash.jkfTGsqX.dpuf

"The problem with distribution and exhibition in this country". More ink has been spilled over this topic in the last 20 years than any other in the industry.

In 2013, are we any closer to finding a route through the bottlenecks that block filmmakers' access to audiences?

Peter Castaldi reignited the debate in his article Australian Cinema is Dead Long Live Australian Cinema. Over the past week, I've talked to Peter about a follow-up which proposes some radical solutions. This week ScreenPro is publishing his article in full.

- See more at: http://www.screenpro.tv/site/item.cfm?item=42C4DA55C290F6C97F46E0DE31270DED#sthash.jkfTGsqX.dpuf

"The problem with distribution and exhibition in this country". More ink has been spilled over this topic in the last 20 years than any other in the industry.

In 2013, are we any closer to finding a route through the bottlenecks that block filmmakers' access to audiences?

Peter Castaldi reignited the debate in his article Australian Cinema is Dead Long Live Australian Cinema. Over the past week, I've talked to Peter about a follow-up which proposes some radical solutions. This week ScreenPro is publishing his article in full.

- See more at: http://www.screenpro.tv/site/item.cfm?item=42C4DA55C290F6C97F46E0DE31270DED#sthash.jkfTGsqX.dpuf

In 2013, are we any closer to finding a route through the bottlenecks that block filmmakers' access to audiences? Peter Castaldi reignited the debate in his article "Australian Cinema is Dead Long Live Australian Cinema". Over the past week, I've talked to Peter about a follow-up which proposes some radical solutions. This week ScreenPro is publishing his article in full.

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"The problem with distribution and exhibition in this country". More ink has been spilled over this topic in the last 20 years than any other in the industry.

In 2013, are we any closer to finding a route through the bottlenecks that block filmmakers' access to audiences?

Peter Castaldi reignited the debate in his article Australian Cinema is Dead Long Live Australian Cinema. Over the past week, I've talked to Peter about a follow-up which proposes some radical solutions. This week ScreenPro is publishing his article in full.

- See more at: http://www.screenpro.tv/site/item.cfm?item=42C4DA55C290F6C97F46E0DE31270DED#sthash.jkfTGsqX.dpuf